Feel, See, Hear! is an exploration in to the world of Maria Montessori through knitted textiles with the intention to create longevity within children's clothing through interactive and playful elements. Through these sensorial features, the curiosity and imagination of children is stimulated and encouraged. The preceding knitted samples (see here) were taken on a play day out into a local Montessori At Home setting where a group of children aged 3-5 were given an opportunity to, Feel, See and Hear! and they certainly did. The concentration of the children was remarkable as new games, dress-ups and stories were created.

 

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This fabric was based on Montessori Visual Sense; Brown Stairs, where ten wooden blocks, graded in width, are used as building blocks (with or without other building blocks such as the pink tower = that's when it starts to gets really exciting!).

This knitted piece was far from a set of solid wooden blocks and I felt it was necessary to let it do what it wanted which was to curl up. Each three-dimensional segment, rolls up almost as a papyros and when the whole length of the fabric is brushed along by a hand, it creates a tingly sensation at the palm and fingertips.

See


This piece was based on Montessori Visual Sense; Constructive Triangles where various triangles are embedded and slotted within each other. 

The key aims of this knitted translation of the activity were to calculate the triangles visible, join up the little hatches for the practice of button fastenings and feel the varied and contrasting knitted textures with finger tips.

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This piece was inspired by Montessori Auditory Senses. The bells which are used in the classrooms were replaced by individually cut and painted walnut-wood sequins, which were hand sewn at each point of tassels. When fabric was moved or shaken, a gentle rattle, almost a rain-like sound effect was produced.